GLEN BALDRIDGE

EXHIBITIONS AND NEWS

Aug 18

Glen Baldridge
Killer Moon

Halsey McKay Gallery
Aug. 7-24th, 2014
opening reception Aug.10th, 12-4 pm


Jul 23
Glen BaldridgeKiller Moon
Halsey McKay GalleryAug. 7-24th, 2014opening reception Aug.10th, 12-4 pm

Glen Baldridge
Killer Moon

Halsey McKay Gallery
Aug. 7-24th, 2014
opening reception Aug.10th, 12-4 pm


Jul 10
Nightcurated by Michael Krueger7/18/2014 – 8/30/2014
works by Glen Baldridge, Louise Sheldon, Chris Duncan, Alex Kvares and more!
Haw Contemporary1600 Liberty, Kansas City, MO 64102

Night
curated by Michael Krueger

7/18/2014 – 8/30/2014

works by Glen Baldridge, Louise Sheldon, Chris Duncan, Alex Kvares and more!

Haw Contemporary
1600 Liberty, Kansas City, MO 64102

"It’s a Bored Nation"June 13 - July 26Kunsthalle Projects111 Front Street, Suite #212Thursday - Saturday, 1-6pmGlen BaldridgeRobert DeedsGhost of a DreamDelia GonzalezWilliam HempelErik HougenDaniel KingeryLiliya LifanovaWyatt NashStephen NeidichAlbert SheltonDoug YoungRhys ZiembaJeremy Zini

"It’s a Bored Nation"
June 13 - July 26

Kunsthalle Projects
111 Front Street, Suite #212
Thursday - Saturday, 1-6pm

Glen Baldridge
Robert Deeds
Ghost of a Dream
Delia Gonzalez
William Hempel
Erik Hougen
Daniel Kingery
Liliya Lifanova
Wyatt Nash
Stephen Neidich
Albert Shelton
Doug Young
Rhys Ziemba
Jeremy Zini


May 24
Speaking today at Tyler School of Arts for Print/Think conference

http://tyler.temple.edu/print-think

Tyler School of Art Printmaking is pleased to announce Print Think, a one-day conference on May 24, 2014 aimed at fostering conversation about the present and future of the print. 
Printmaking has long appropriated technological innovation from the commercial printing industry to explore new possibilities of the matrix and multiple for the artist. For the first Tyler Print Think, we are focusing on the expanding role of 21st century rapid prototyping technology. Laser cutters, vinyl plotters, CNC Routers, and 3D printers are proven game changers for industrial designers and innovators of all sorts, but what can these exciting new tools produce in the hands of a printmaker? 
Print Think will feature a panel discussion and presentations by noted artists, hands-on technical demonstrations at Tyler’s printmaking and digital fabrication labs, and lively conversations.

Speaking today at Tyler School of Arts for Print/Think conference

http://tyler.temple.edu/print-think

Tyler School of Art Printmaking is pleased to announce Print Think, a one-day conference on May 24, 2014 aimed at fostering conversation about the present and future of the print.
Printmaking has long appropriated technological innovation from the commercial printing industry to explore new possibilities of the matrix and multiple for the artist. For the first Tyler Print Think, we are focusing on the expanding role of 21st century rapid prototyping technology. Laser cutters, vinyl plotters, CNC Routers, and 3D printers are proven game changers for industrial designers and innovators of all sorts, but what can these exciting new tools produce in the hands of a printmaker?
Print Think will feature a panel discussion and presentations by noted artists, hands-on technical demonstrations at Tyler’s printmaking and digital fabrication labs, and lively conversations.


May 4
New work at Klaus von Nichtssagend’s booth at NADA New York
 
NADA New York
Glen Baldridge, Benjamin Butler, Joy Curtis, David Gilbert
May 9 - May 11, 2014
Booth 103
 
Pier 36 at Basketball City
299 South Street on the East River
New York, NY 10002
click here for directions

New work at Klaus von Nichtssagend’s booth at NADA New York

 
NADA New York
Glen Baldridge, Benjamin Butler, Joy Curtis, David Gilbert
May 9 - May 11, 2014
Booth 103
 
Pier 36 at Basketball City
299 South Street on the East River
New York, NY 10002

Nice write up of Thousand Year Old Child on Printeresting

Nice write up of Thousand Year Old Child on Printeresting


Apr 23
Artforum critics’ pick
“Thousand Year Old Child”
PLANTHOUSE107 West 28th StreetMarch 25–May 2
A thousand years later, the eponymous child evoked by this group show has apparently not learned any manners. Participating artists Glen Baldridge, Ian Cooper, and David Kennedy Cutler present an exhibition that personifies our unwavering pursuit of eternal youth—that crown jewel of vivacity we feverishly crave (as evidenced by today’s abundant health-food supplements, probiotic treatments, and quick over-the-counter cures). Astutely, the twenty-eight works on view—sculptures, prints, and installations—have all anticipated the dystrophic consequences of pursuing the unobtainable.
As if this child had been anticipating our arrival for ages, Baldridge’s crooked and bowed Blinds, 2014, hung on Planthouse’s doors, are suspiciously ruffled, as if by some adolescent peeping Tom. Once inside, the viewer is assaulted by anarchic visual references to vomit, amputated limbs, erections, fistfights, and bloody knuckles. Left to his or her (although probably his) own devices, it seems this child has placed the gallery in a state of chic disarray. Take David Kennedy Cutler’s sculpture series “Commodity,” 2014, which is presented on the floor in the first gallery as discarded limbs with faded tattoos—extremities carefully sculpted from tree branches, Permalac, and a progressive inkjet-on-aluminum process.
In a second room, Ian Cooper’s oversized and Oldenburgesque sculptures are executed with a refreshing irreverence. Expertly produced works titled Missing (nude Tinkerbell) and Missing (briefs) (both 2014) come together as a stylized milk carton, and while they appear simply tossed into the gallery like rubbish, their sheer monumentality and references to the body achieve an uncanny resonance. Framed on a nearby wall, Baldridge’s meticulous trio of panties, I cannot lie, 2012, recalls the colors of Neapolitan ice cream, and is made with cast cotton and handmade paper, which illustrate—through numerous sags and wrinkles—undesired signs of aging. Despite the bubblegum palette, these works prompt an all-but-gentle reminder: Vanity is among the most fleeting of phenomena, anchored to the obstinate and impartial burden of time.
— Gabriel H. Sanchez

Artforum critics’ pick

“Thousand Year Old Child”

PLANTHOUSE
107 West 28th Street
March 25–May 2

A thousand years later, the eponymous child evoked by this group show has apparently not learned any manners. Participating artists Glen BaldridgeIan Cooper, and David Kennedy Cutler present an exhibition that personifies our unwavering pursuit of eternal youth—that crown jewel of vivacity we feverishly crave (as evidenced by today’s abundant health-food supplements, probiotic treatments, and quick over-the-counter cures). Astutely, the twenty-eight works on view—sculptures, prints, and installations—have all anticipated the dystrophic consequences of pursuing the unobtainable.

As if this child had been anticipating our arrival for ages, Baldridge’s crooked and bowed Blinds, 2014, hung on Planthouse’s doors, are suspiciously ruffled, as if by some adolescent peeping Tom. Once inside, the viewer is assaulted by anarchic visual references to vomit, amputated limbs, erections, fistfights, and bloody knuckles. Left to his or her (although probably his) own devices, it seems this child has placed the gallery in a state of chic disarray. Take David Kennedy Cutler’s sculpture series “Commodity,” 2014, which is presented on the floor in the first gallery as discarded limbs with faded tattoos—extremities carefully sculpted from tree branches, Permalac, and a progressive inkjet-on-aluminum process.

In a second room, Ian Cooper’s oversized and Oldenburgesque sculptures are executed with a refreshing irreverence. Expertly produced works titled Missing (nude Tinkerbell) and Missing (briefs) (both 2014) come together as a stylized milk carton, and while they appear simply tossed into the gallery like rubbish, their sheer monumentality and references to the body achieve an uncanny resonance. Framed on a nearby wall, Baldridge’s meticulous trio of panties, I cannot lie, 2012, recalls the colors of Neapolitan ice cream, and is made with cast cotton and handmade paper, which illustrate—through numerous sags and wrinkles—undesired signs of aging. Despite the bubblegum palette, these works prompt an all-but-gentle reminder: Vanity is among the most fleeting of phenomena, anchored to the obstinate and impartial burden of time.

— Gabriel H. Sanchez


Apr 14

Installation shots from 

Thousand Year Old Child

Glen Baldridge, Ian Cooper, and David Kennedy Cutler 


On View: March 25 - May 2, 2014

Planthouse
107 W 28th St. NY, NY 10001


Apr 7

NEW PRINTS in conjunction with the “Thousand Year Old Child” exhibition at Planthouse!

Suite of 3 prints in custom portfolio case
Edition of 30
published by Planthouse


Glen Baldridge
Trapper Keeper, 2014
Letterpress
15.25 x 11 inches

David Kennedy Cutler
Burrow, 2014
Inkjet and letterpress on paper
15.25 x 11 inches

Ian Cooper
Coin Purse, 2014
Letterpress and silk screen on paper with die cuts, incisions, & folds
11 x 15.25 inches


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